miércoles, 6 de enero de 2021

What Biden and Trump voters say they want the other candidate's supporters to know about them

Rubén Weinsteiner


“We the people, not the government, are in charge. We set the standard. We accept or reject ideals that are what we believe is good for our brothers and sisters, no matter what. To love is the only truth. I want what is best for the nation, not for just me.”

Man, 50s


“I think this has been a very contentious election. If you don't agree with those who support Biden, you are often labeled a racist or a hatemonger, etc. I think it is a shame that they are unable to accept that we have different opinions and can disagree without it leading to violence as it has.”

Woman, 80s


“Trump has helped people more than Biden ever will. Biden cannot be trusted.”

Woman, 20s


“As a Trump supporter, I am not your enemy (but you make me feel like it).”

Man, 40s


“I believe every person should take responsibility for one's self and family and not expect someone else to provide for them. I believe in freedom and do not want the U.S. to go to socialism or worse.”

Woman, 80s


“Free speech must continue to flow. I believe we can disagree about many things without labeling each other as immoral, bad, ‘Hitler-esque,’ or racist. I am teachable, are you?”

Woman, 60s


“I am not deplorable, homophobic, xenophobic, gynophobic, or racist. Youth have been and continue to be indoctrinated against everything and everyone that is not or doesn’t support the far left.”

Man, 60s


“Your party has been hijacked by hate. You are a party that is solely against things with no clear message of what you are for. You enabled an autocrat and no one, especially yourselves should let you off the hook for that.”

Man, 30s


“I am a proud American. I am not a socialist devil. I am not better than you, and I know there are many different paths to peacefully achieve our shared goals if we just take our blinders off and work together.”

Man, 70s


“I believe the country does better with a strong middle class and a well-educated populace. I don’t believe the Republican Party currently supports the common man vs. special interest/lobbyists. I deplore the hate-spewing Republican/conservative media, I’m confused as to how they advance your message.”

Woman, 60s


“As a farmer, I love our country and see my family try to raise crops and livestock cheaply and have to work many long hours with expensive equipment. When they end up not making a good living wage it is very shattering. Americans demand cheap food and we are not allowed to set our sale price. Also, we can't understand why our elected officials are not honest and don't work together to improve the welfare of the common family.”

Woman, 80s


“I want our country to retain our basic rights (e.g., religious freedom, freedom of speech, the right to life for all including the unborn).”

Woman, 70s


“We have more similarities than differences, but the big things like racism, gun control and hate groups cannot be negotiated.”

Woman, 50s


“Even though we are all individuals, we must work as a community. This is not about individual rights. It must be for the greater good. We need to help and protect those in need. We need less ‘my way or the highway.’”

Man, 60s


“To vote for Donald Trump, you are either incredibly self-centered (i.e., support the economy over humanity) or a racist. Equality and equity for Black people do not automatically translate to socialism. Most people want a fair opportunity to succeed and not a hand-out.”

Man, 30s


“I don’t focus on us and them, and I don’t place them into stereotypical groups, as they should not do either. We probably have many more things in common than we don’t, but we need to find the most appropriate person to unite this country.”

Woman, 30s


“We are all brothers and sisters united together in the land of the free and the brave! I would remind them of our patriotic duty to protect America, and why it matters.”

Man, 30s


“We will give Biden the same respect and cooperation you gave President Trump for the last four years.”

Woman, 60s


“You voted for him, now we're stuck with him. You only have yourself to blame when you start losing your constitutional rights, your taxes go sky high, and your retirement is gone. Thanks a lot, you idiots.”

Man, 40s


“We are Americans, not enemies. Different political views should not disrupt friendships, and our system of government is based on give and take. I believe the Republican Party has forsaken this principle. ... The Republican Party went so far right and rigid, that it left people like me behind.”

Man, 70s


“I would have them understand that, in spite of our differences, I do not think they’re all idiots or undeserving of their own free will and self-determination. I blame the vectors of misinformation and divisiveness rather than the ‘victims’ on both sides. I would have them understand that I’m willing to have a learning conversation based on truth, morality, and doing what’s best for all of us if they are willing to as well.”

Man, 30s


“I am more educated and informed than the average Trump supporter. Trump supporters and I share much in common as far as demographic and other characteristics. However, I have taken the time to develop a sophisticated understanding of social and political phenomena. I recognize that the problems facing society are complex and require complex policy solutions. The simplistic solutions to these problems that Trump offers his supporters are not appealing to me. I realize as I am writing this how elitist I sound. But it’s the truth.”

Man, 30s


“I'm not filled with the hatred they are filled with.”

Woman, 70s


“It’s hard for me to answer this because I don’t think Trump supporters are interested in understanding me. And I can’t understand how they can admire someone who is a bully.”

Woman, 70s


“I think we all need to focus less on partisanship and more on the fact that we are all Americans who want our country to succeed – which means everyone succeeds, not just a few.”

Woman, 30s


“Hate is not acceptable. Voting for a candidate that supports hate against minorities and women is an act of hate against those people. Respect, decency, education and science should be the basis of political debates.”

Woman, 50s


“I would like the evangelical Christians who support Trump to know that I also consider myself to be a Christian and I strongly believe that we can coexist in a respectful manner despite our different political perspectives.”

Woman, 50s


“The Republican Party is morphing into the blue-collar party, while the Democrats are adding to their ivory tower.”

Man, 30s


“I live in a rural area, care about all my neighbors, respect gun rights, believe in non-intrusive government, and want the government to work to help our community and all citizens lives better lives.”

Man, 60s


“I’m not a racist. I want what’s best for the economy of our country. The president doesn’t have much power on his own.”

Woman, 20s


“Biden supporters need to grow up and stop acting like morons. They call conservatives Nazis and racists, and some have even said they think we should die of coronavirus. Some have even said we should burn in hell. They need to realize that we are their neighbors, friends, and sometimes we are family members. Most conservatives don’t talk about politics because liberals get so triggered about every difference between us and them. I don't want to lose my friends and I don't want to alienate my family, so I stay quiet. They need to realize that they are not always right and there are other ways of looking at things. And just because I don't fight with you, does not mean I agree with you. BE NICE!”

Woman, 60s


“Stop listening to Fox News and shock talk radio and just realize that we are neighbors and could be friends.”

Woman, 70s


“I believe both parties need to set aside their anger and work together.”

Man, 60s


“Choosing to be kind is not choosing weakness.”

Man, 40s


“I believe words matter. I believe the leader of our nation should be a model of how our citizens should treat each other, including all members of our globalized world, and how we should be treated. ”

Woman, 40s


“Leftists don’t want to give people ‘free stuff,’ we want to give people what they already deserve. ... We don’t want the government to run everything – we want to give people more power over their lives. Instead of buying into the demonizations and caricatures, talk to us. You might find many points of agreement with progressives, socialists and anarchists if you’re willing to look for them. ... Bottom line: Engage us in discussion with an open mind and you might be surprised at how much common ground there is!”

Man, 30s


“The good of the country requires compromise and cooperation. Name-calling doesn’t work. Lies don’t work. We need to heal.”

Woman, 60s


“Stop only watching mainstream news and do more research on your own. Try to find a news source on a level playing field and don’t be closed-minded.”

Man, 20s


“A person’s support of a candidate or party does not make that person a Marxist or socialist – I would argue those people couldn’t even properly define either term – and if more people were willing to have an open dialogue, they would find average Americans will agree on more than they disagree.”

Man, 30s


“I need a lot of medical appointments and medications, but I can’t leave the state or my insurance is worthless. I believe health care should be a human right. Biden may not be there yet, but at least [Biden is] not actively trying to gut the medical system, so he got my vote.”

Woman, 40s


“Know that the media is very biased and has misled many about the issues, personalities and accomplishments of the candidates.”

Woman, 70s


“I am not – and most Republicans are not – haters. We cringed at Trump’s words as much as you did. We want many of the same things, we just see different paths to accomplishing them. Let's both listen with open hearts and heads.”

Woman, 60s


“I think climate change is an existential threat to everybody. And I am strongly in favor of fair and free elections, even if they don’t provide the results I want.”

Man, 30s


“Compassion, honesty, integrity and character matter in our elected officials. Regardless of Trump’s political views, he did not display any of these qualities.”

Woman, 60s


“We want the same things: Security, happiness, prosperity. We also probably like similar things: Sports, movies, music, etc. In the end, we’re pretty similar. ... In fact, we have more in common than we don’t.”

Man, 20s


“By voting for Joe Biden, I am actually furthering most of their own personal interests, particularly economically, and definitely the interests of the majority of the country. I am pretty far left on the political spectrum, but that does not make me a ‘socialist.’”

Woman, 30s


“I am an ordinary American citizen whose great-grandma was a slave. I worked for more than 30 years before retiring. I want a better and diverse America to live in same as you.”

Woman, 40s


“We all don’t fit into the ‘soy latte drinking godless hippie elite’ stereotype.”

Woman, 50s


“That I am deeply religious, patriotic, committed to my family and community. That I don’t see them as my enemy and, even if we disagree, we are all Americans and have much common ground.”

Man, 30s


“The vast majority of Democrats do not condone voter fraud or false claims of voter fraud. Trump supporters need to get their information from objective news sources.”

Woman, 70s


“I support the average American and feel strongly that all Americans should have access to reasonably affordable health care. I have worked all my life and raised a family never needing public help, but know everyone is not as fortunate, and I am willing to give others less fortunate the help they need.”

Woman, 80s


“Republicans are not racist, homophobic, ‘better than thous.’ I believe that generally, Republicans are concerned about further demoralization and destruction of the foundations this country was founded upon.”

Woman, 30s


“I am a middle-class American facing the same issues you are. We all want the best for our families. Social problems are the problem of the middle class whether we like it or not, it’s in our neighborhoods.”

Woman, 30s


“I think it is [hypocritical] to get your news from multiple sources, including ones typically from the point of view of the "other side," then vote on a candidate's policies and platform versus just looking at their personality.”

Woman, 60s


“We have a lot of the same beliefs, and if they would just stop listening to all the nonsense Fox News puts out and all the lies Donald Trump says, then we could all get along much better.”

Man, 40s


“I’m an ordinary person just like them, but I value my rights and freedoms. I believe we can all get along with each other if we are all willing to try. I don’t dislike people because they are Democrats. I try to get along with everyone; I believe we all have a right to our own opinions, and I will respect their right to their opinion.”

Woman, 70s


“They need to do their homework. Biden has so much baggage that will prevent him from being an effective leader. There is clearly a double standard at work.”

Man, 70s


“I think the most important thing for all of us is to do all we can to slow and mitigate the impacts of climate change. Our current arguments about health care, the economy, immigration and foreign policy will be pointless in the face of climate change.”

Woman, 20s


“I think that we all want the same things: Security, safety, good health, the ability to provide for ourselves and our families, meaningful work for ourselves and our children, and the preservation of freedoms as stated in our Constitution. I believe that for all citizens of this country, not [just] those who look like me or worship like me. I believe that there are many Trump supporters who also think that.”

Woman, 60s


“While the president can come off as a horse's ass, he still did an extraordinary job for the people of the U.S. Biden is a career politician and does not have the people's best interests at heart. He's a wolf in sheep's clothing. ... I am sickened by thoughts of what the new administration will inflict upon us by destroying the intent of our Constitution and will dismantle governance based upon ‘One Nation Under God.’”

Woman, 60s


“To know the facts BEFORE making a decision about things.”

Man, 50s


“I’m a patriot that believes in our Founding Fathers and the Constitution as it was written.”

Man, 50s


“I don't need to be taken care of by the federal government. Both parties need to take care of the common good and stay out of everything else. I have a very narrow view of what the common good is.”

Man, 60s


“I am a person who believes that we, the richest country in the world, should do affordable good deeds for those citizens and those who are longing to become citizens of our great country.”

Woman, 70s


“Democrats care just as much about the country as Republicans do. I always get the feeling the MAGA people think they are the only ones who care about the USA.”

Woman, 50s


“I vote Democratic because I care about others and want everyone to have the same opportunity. I do not want or need free handouts from the government, but I believe more social programs for those that need it will benefit the country and communities as a whole.”

Woman, 30s


“Get information from sources other than the biased liberal media.”

Man, 60s


“Conservatives love the U.S. and personal liberty. We don't want big government ruling over us, we want control of our lives.”

Man, 50s


“Stereotyping the opposition as uneducated and exclusively White and male is an incorrect generalization.”

Man, 60s


“We need to care for each other rather than giving that control to the government. A socialist nation would be disastrous.”

Woman, 60s


“A lot of us also love God, own guns, work for a living, and want what’s best for this country that we also love. Democrats are not evil or lazy people like they have been portrayed and I’m very frustrated to see us being made out to be that way.”

Woman, 30s


“I am a terminally ill single mom. Biden is going to add tax hikes [and] I am already not making it financially. I do not feel protected.”

Woman, 40s


“I am a conservative who believes Trump is a want-to-be autocrat, not what the Republican Party is supposed to be about.”

Man, 40s


“We all want the same things: To take care of our families, be financially secure as much as possible, and live in communities that thrive and serve our needs. I may not support your choice of candidates, but I will fight for your right to support them.”

Man, 50s


“Everyone is different, and there can be a middle point where both supporters meet. That goes for everyone. But Biden supporters shame anyone who voted for Trump, and vice versa.”

Man, 20s


“Being a supporter of Donald Trump does not make me evil. I believe in protecting individual freedoms and giving less power to the government. I believe the best social support for anyone is a job, but we must help those who cannot work or cannot get adequate work.”

Woman, 70s


“For the last four years, you have called me racist, White privileged, etc. Also, you said ‘not my President.’ Now you want unity. Seriously, you supported riots that destroyed property and led to violence. You are the problem, not me. I did not vote for or want him, but Biden will be my President. This is why we have a system.”

Woman, 50s


“Beneath the surface, I think we all want the same thing. The ability to coexist peacefully, good jobs, equality, respect, and good health. Pointing out injustices is not being unpatriotic. I love this country, too, but right is right and wrong is wrong.”

Woman, 40s


“I am not your enemy, I just have different opinions than you. I am not stupid, ignorant or evil. I love God, family and country, in that order.”

Woman, 60s


“That I am for America and they are not. I am for freedom, they are not. I am for free elections, they are not. I am for giving a hand up, not a hand out. I am for legal immigration, they are not. I am for all races, they are not. I am for law and order, they are not.”

Man, 60s


“I am an old school American patriot and I will not tolerate any move towards socialism, period. My father and uncles fought in WWII to prevent this from happening, but young people, for the most part, have no knowledge or appreciation of our history.”

Man, 60s


“I come from an immigrant family. There are many good people just looking for a better life and do not have any intention of harming others.”

Man, 50s


“I am an old school Democrat, I believe in working for a living and representing the ordinary working class citizens by a fair and honest government.”

Man, 60s


“I believe that America is a place of freedom, and I believe in the right to life. I believe in equality of opportunity and that every American has the opportunity to work hard and pull themselves up.”

Woman, 20s


“Trump is playing with all of you. He doesn’t care about the community.”

Woman, 50s


“It is more important to me that we figure out our differences and work to resolve them instead of making such a political divide. We are Americans first.”

Man, 70s


“I am reaching retirement age. I have worked since I was a teenager. I want to be able to retire.”

Woman, 50s


“I couldn’t vote for Trump because I’m not racist and I don’t hate women. I feel like a fair amount of his supporters feel this way. He is a disgusting man that hates so many groups and doesn’t mind the idea of inciting a riot.”

Woman, 30s


“We're not as different as you've been led to believe by mainstream media.”

Woman, 30s


“I want the world to be a better place, and Democratic is not the way to go right now. Wanting to bring immigrants back to America is not the right way to go about it, and taking advantage of the poor is making it worse as well.”

Woman, 30s


“I am very patriotic and feel this country is a special place with a deity-inspired Constitution, which needs to be followed and interpreted as closely as possible. Truth and justice in government is critical and has been slipping too much for the good of you, me, and all citizens.”

Man, 70s


“Although I’m a registered Republican, it seems like the party has become pretty heartless toward the poor and immigrants or refugees, and it makes it hard for me to support them.”

Woman, 40s


“Immigration has made this country stronger, not weaker.”

Man, 40s


“Just because my views are different doesn’t mean I support everything the party I voted for supports, nor do I believe that your different views are necessarily ‘wrong.’”

Man, 20s


“The people who aren’t like you aren’t animals or subhuman or anything else Trump tells you they are. They’re people too. They have rights, even if they crossed the border illegally.”

Man, 50s


“I am a conservative American who believes in a limited government as conceived and written by our Founding Fathers. I believe in low taxes, personal responsibility, hard work and fairness. I believe in the genius of capitalism and the seductive evils of socialism. I believe that America is the greatest country in the history of the world. Competition is good – may the best man win.”

Man, 60s


“I don’t want socialism. I want equal rights and fair treatment for all U.S. citizens.”

Man, 20s


“I feel strongly about following the Constitution, not changing it. I don't feel I have been ‘entitled’ to anything and don’t want a hand out. I work hard and get what I deserve. Life isn’t about free things.”

Man, 60s


“Not all Democrats are in favor of the radical policies put out by some members of the party.”

Man, <20


“I’m just the average person that works for a living and lives check-to-check. I don’t have money put away for a rainy day, and I don’t have a savings account or a retirement fund. I work hard for what I got and nothing was ever given to me, not even opportunities.”

Man, 50s


“Neither one of us has to be afraid of the future of the USA. It isn’t a finite pie that if I have a slice you get less – it’s a renewable resource that we can all contribute to and take from. We aren’t enemies. But you, Trump supporter, have lost my trust and faith and have to earn it back.”

Woman, 50s


“He sold us out and has been for 47 years. He lies constantly and would say anything to get elected. He’s a Trojan horse, but they pulled him inside the walls. Many of them will live to regret voting for him.”

Man, 60s


“I want Trump supporters to know that I am interested in the well-being of people and I want to have collaborative conversations with others with different viewpoints respectfully.”

Woman, 20s


“The rhetoric of Trump and the right makes me feel unsafe in my own country. I work hard for my family too, and I don’t want to be attacked because I think America is better when we are open and forward-looking, not closed and reactive. Also, I do not understand how the right wing can believe the ludicrous conspiracies which claim traditional institutions are corrupt or fake.”

Woman, 30s


“I am a person first, and I should have the same rights and be treated the same as you believe you should be treated.”

Man, 20s


“I believe that THEY deserve basic human dignity also, and that includes health care. I work hard and came from a poor White family, but I worked hard to pull myself up. They don’t want people to be freeloaders, but they need to have faith in the basic goodness of people. No one wants to take advantage of others (or very few do).”

Woman, 50s


“I am a Republican and a veteran. I am an American. Just because you don't like something I do does not mean you can outlaw it because you don't like it. There is a Constitution. Try reading it for a change.”

Man, 50s


“I prepare and take care of myself. I don't look to the government for handouts. I follow the rules or work to change them. I don't think luxuries are essential. Deprivation builds character. The family unit is essential to a strong society.”

Man, 70s


“As a low-income person of color, I feel excluded from Donald Trump’s policies. I don’t feel like he cares about anyone who is not a cisgender, heterosexual, White male or female.”

Woman, 20s


“Love is something we all need to have for each other if we really want things to get better.”

Man, 60s


“We're all Americans. …There's no reason we can’t figure things out and disagree on issues without vilifying those you don't agree with.”

Man, 40s


“We believe in freedom, the power of the individual versus government and traditional value, vehemently opposing ‘cancel culture,’ and in the goodness and greatness of our country.”

Man, 70s


“I care about TRUTH and transparency. You can’t just make up your own facts or call someone ‘fake news’ just because they say something you don’t agree with!”

Woman, 60s


“We use common sense and pay attention so we know lies from facts.”

Man, 60s


“We didn’t start the virus. Not all of us want the dreamers to get a free pass. We aren’t lying that masks can help. It’s all we have right now.”

Woman, 40s


“Nothing is free. Everything that you think Biden will make free has to be paid for somehow and is usually done so by raising taxes on those of us who can barely pay our taxes as it is.”

Man, 30s


“I am not racist or sexist. I believe in personal responsibility and equal opportunity for all, not equal outcomes. Outcomes are left up to individuals.”

Man, 40s


“All of us are Americans and, for the good of the country, we need to get along instead of dividing the country, which serves no purpose. We all want the same things in life, so we need to all work together instead of viewing each other as enemies. One side is no more evil than the other and without each other this nation will never be ‘Great.’”

Woman, 60s


“That they are uneducated, so trying to push their beliefs on me is not going to go over well.”

Man, 20s


“Socialism is not the answer. Biden is a puppet and is being used to get [Kamala] Harris in office. The 25th amendment will be used to remove Biden by his own party, making Harris president and opening up a ton of appointed positions and further rendering our election process worthless.”

Man, 30s


“Being a God-fearing Christian is a good thing for America. We don’t go on a rampage and have riots, unlike the Democrats and Antifa and Black Lives Matter, if we don’t win an election.”

Man, 50s


“Religious freedoms are essential to my existence.”

Man, 70s


“You must have an open mind. Do not rely on social media or one form of media (channel) for news.”

Woman, 60s


“I’m not saying Biden is the best option. It’s just that Trump definitely isn’t the right option either.”

Woman, 20s


“They need to know that the Trump presidency had and has real consequences for people, and they need to have empathy and consider people who are less privileged than them.”

Woman, 20s


“My safety and well-being as someone who is different than you is more important than Trump’s economic decisions, which you seem to revere so much more than your fellow human beings.”

Woman, 20s


“Trump has a proven record of making the U.S. a better place in the four years he has been in office. Biden is a politician that has not helped the U.S. in his 40-plus years in office.”

Man, 50s


“I want them to understand that I am not a wealthy snob. I grew up in a rural area and I understand a lot more than they might believe. I think we can come to an understanding.”

Woman, 60s


“We care about the well-being of all people. The right to life rhetoric is ridiculous if it’s really only a right to birth. Right to life should care for the basic needs of all. If you demand a baby be born, you should be prepared to support their needs for food, clothing, shelter, medical care, education, etc.”

Woman, 70s


“I would like Biden supporters to know that I am allowed to have an opinion. Most Democrats today are not willing to allow for different opinions.”

Man, 40s


“I would like them to understand that I believe that they’ve been brainwashed into being members of a cult. Thus, I have no regard for them or what they think of me.”

Woman, 60s


“I care about the country, the world, the environment, and family ... just like they do. We don’t have to agree on every single item, but we should have respect for differing opinions.”

Woman, 50s


“It’s about the Earth, science, climate change. We should all have the same desire to prolong Earth’s life, and our goals should align for our children’s future.”

Woman, 60s


“Democrats do work. We are not on welfare. We don’t want women to have abortions, however we feel it is their choice.”

Woman, 50s


“I do not agree with everything on the Democratic platform. I do not like extremes on either side. I want to find compromises on issues, but I knew that would never happen under Trump. I feel like he intentionally promoted divisiveness and refused to treat others with respect or civility.”

Woman, 30s


“I try to research as much as possible about the candidates and not just listen to the biased news and commentators. They need to see both sides of the story and let go of their hatred for this president.”

Woman, 70s


“People tend to think of someone who voted for Trump as ignorant and selfish. I wish more people would get to know people of differing views and strive to understand their position. If Biden supporters did this, more of them would realize how narrow-minded a view it is to think this way about Trump supporters.”

Woman, 30s


“They need a better understanding of facts and not assume that if you're not a Trump supporter you're on the far left.”

Woman, 50s


“There are still good, conservative people in the world who want to make a difference and stand up for Christian values and beliefs. People who are against abortion and same-sex marriages. People who are hard-working middle class citizens who are trying to make good choices and do what is right.”

Woman, 40s


“Voter fraud is real, and the Democratic Party does most of it.”

Man, 40s


“I am a gun owner and can do stuff with my hands. We’re not all the stereotype of what they hold of us. But they’re wrong in what they believe about this country.”

Man, 30s


“The things (politicians, ideas, policies) I believe in, I think, would make their lives better – financially, emotionally, physically.”

Woman, 40s


“Get your facts from credible sources, not social media. Do the research yourself so you won't be sucked in by misinformation.”

Man, 60s


“I feel Trump has fueled racial tensions. I feel he has divided the country. Trump has made people mistrust the media and our voting system. He has manipulated the American people into believing everything he says without any basis. I am a lifelong Republican, but I am not a Donald Trump Republican. I am a conservative, but Joe Biden is a much more honorable man.”

Woman, 70s


“I am not a racist. I am not a neo-Nazi. I am not a bigot. I am not a misogynist. I am not a deplorable. I do not hate immigrants, I just want them to enter the U.S. legally. I am not a White supremist. I believe in the laws of this country and feel they need to be followed. I don't think that because I supported President Trump that my name should be put on a list in an attempt to ruin my reputation and my career and try to get people to hate me.”

Man, 60s


“We care about the same things: Family, have a good job to support our family, access to health care, an education of quality for our children, justice for all, good government, strong economy, a country that is not only an economic, but a moral leader on the world scene.”

Woman, 40s


“I would greatly appreciate it if Biden supporters would be even a little more understanding that not everyone agrees with their radical beliefs. ... The liberals have become so intolerant of anyone who disagrees with them, I personally know people who have been wronged for simply having a different political view. ... I would appreciate if the liberals would be more respectful of all people and respect their opinions without getting violent. How many Trump supporters have you seen attacking Biden supporters? None. How many Trump supporters have you seen attacked or harassed? Too many.”

Woman, 20s


“We NEED both parties to contribute to laws to have a successful country. Religion should not dictate women’s medical care. Society norms should adjust as we progress, and [people should] just be more open to listen to people different than them.”

Woman, 50s


“That I am a hardworking woman who has always been self-supporting. Married more than 30 years, mother of three. And the values of hard work, commitment to family, and patriotism are shared by all Democrats I know.”

Woman, 50s


“I’m a gun supporter and owner. I’m a hardworking American that pays for everything with my own hard earned money. I do not live off of assistance programs or take free handouts. ... If you leave me alone, I’ll leave you alone. I protect that which I love and care for. I stand by the constitution and my American rights.”

Woman, 20s


“Trump supporters aren’t racist or bigots. Supporting Trump is more about the movement and ideas than the man.”

Man, 30s


“That conspiracy theories are made up to make them hate liberals, when it doesn't represent who we are.”

Woman, 30s


“I am not an ogre. We may disagree politically, but it does not mean we should hate and disrespect each other.”

Man, 70s


“I have more conservative values than they think. I am not a socialist. I want leaders that know how to govern for all people, not just a few.”

Woman, 50s


“I believe that Black lives matter and that we need to support the police.”

Man, 30s


“As a very liberal person, I think the government should mostly leave people alone to live their lives and pursue their happiness. I want that for EVERYONE, not just people on the same side as me. Government should also function as a way for citizens to have fair and equitable access to opportunity.”

Woman, 30s


“I’m not a socialist. I don’t steal elections. I’m an honest person, just like you!”

Man, 60s


“I’m concerned about the future of this nation and the growing divide between Democrats and Republicans – and the extremities on each side. I believe there is a ground on which we can stand where we are not that different – values that will enrich the future of our children. The democratic system has flaws, but I believe in democracy and the checks and balances in place.”

Woman, 30s


“That if they get their information from politicians or the news, there is no way they have an accurate representation.”

Woman, 70s


“The president has to be a leader and set the tone for the nation. Name-calling, bullying and lying certainly seemed to make people think that is acceptable in the U.S. these days. We can work together only if we respect each other.”

Man, 60s


“I used to vote Democrat in the past, but now I dislike the direction. The party has turned to the far left. I don’t agree with their attacks on the police or immigration officers. They’re simply enforcing the laws. If you don’t like the laws, change them.”

Man, 50s


“We're not automatically racist and sexist just for voting for Trump”

Man, 30s


“I am an educated American who has served this country for more than two decades as an army officer. I have seen what socialism and communism does to a nation, and it appears to me that most people here do not have any understanding of where this nation is presently headed under a Biden administration.”

Man, 80s


“I'm an ordinary citizen like them, working hard every day to pay bills and make a positive contribution to sustain and grow jobs in the U.S. ... I care about you and want us to openly communicate and be the answer, not the problem.”

Woman, 60s


“Not everything is about the economy. Human rights are more important than making money and treating this country as a business.”

Woman, 30s


“I am interested in FACTS, and I read and do research to support my opinions. I would not listen to candidates and pundits who spew lies and negativity to be assured of loyalty from their base.”

Woman, 70s


“People who vote against Donald Trump don’t hate America. We just want everyone, regardless of gender, ethnicity, religion or anything else to feel welcomed.”

Woman 60 s



Rubén Weinsteiner

 

Rubén Weinsteiner is a political consultant. He directed more than 100 electoral campaigns in the USA, South America, Germany and Spain. He is a university professor and advisor to governments and companies




miércoles, 28 de octubre de 2020

Latino voters’ interest in presidential race is mixed, and about half are ‘extremely motivated’ to vote



Latino voters are less likely than all U.S. voters to say they are extremely motivated to vote in the upcoming presidential election, with the Latino electorate expressing less interest overall in the presidential campaigns.

About half of Latino registered voters (54%) say they are extremely motivated to vote this year, compared with two-thirds of U.S. voters overall (69%). Meanwhile, a lower share of Latino voters (58%) than U.S. voters (69%) say they have given a lot of thought to the candidates. And compared with U.S. voters, a slightly lower share of Latino voters say it really matters who wins, 73% vs. 78%. In 2016, Latino voters also reported lower levels of interest in the election and in voting than U.S. voters overall.

A record 32 million Hispanics are projected to be eligible to vote in 2020, making up 13% of all U.S. eligible voters and exceeding for the first time the number of Black eligible voters in a presidential election. (Explore our interactive maps and tables to see Latino eligible voters by state and congressional district.)

How we did this

To explore Hispanic voter engagement in this year’s presidential election, we surveyed 11,929 U.S. adults, including 1,347 Hispanic registered voters, from Sept. 30 to Oct. 5, 2020. Everyone who took part is a member of Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel (ATP), an online survey panel that is recruited through national, random sampling of residential addresses. This way nearly all U.S. adults have a chance of selection. The survey is weighted to be representative of the U.S. adult population by gender, race, ethnicity, partisan affiliation, education and other categories. Read more about the ATP’s methodology.

Here are the questions used for this report, along with responses, and its methodology.

A record number of Americans have voted before Election Day, and it is possible overall U.S. voter turnout will reach historically high levels in 2020. Latinos have typically voted at lower rates than U.S. voters overall. In 2016, 48% of Latino eligible voters said they voted, a similar share to 2012 and lower than the 61% of all U.S. eligible voters who cast a ballot four years ago. (Eligible voters are adult U.S. citizens, whether registered to vote or not.)

Engagement varies among some groups of Hispanics who are registered to vote. College graduates are more likely than those with some college education or less to say they are extremely motivated to vote (68% vs. 50%), have given a lot of thought to the presidential candidates (71% vs. 54%) and that it really matters who wins (80% vs. 71%).

Higher shares of Latino registered voters ages 50 and older than those 18 to 49 are extremely motivated to vote (65% vs. 48%), have given a lot of thought to the presidential candidates (68% vs. 52%) and say it really matters who wins (80% vs. 68%). These differences by age are also seen among all U.S. voters.

Rubén Wensteiner

jueves, 22 de octubre de 2020

Large Shares of Voters Plan To Vote a Straight Party Ticket for President, Senate and House



Some races do not include candidates of both major parties (for example, a few districts in California have two Democratic and no Republican candidates). Excluding these handful of races where there are not two major party candidates running does not meaningfully impact the conclusions of this report, but they have been included in the analyses presented here.

Everyone who took part in this survey is a member of Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel (ATP), an online survey panel that is recruited through national, random sampling of residential addressees. This way nearly all U.S. adults have a chance of selection. The survey is weighted to be representative of the U.S. adult population by gender, race, ethnicity, partisan affiliation, education and other categories. Read more about the ATP’s methodology.

In an era of increasing partisanship, split-ticket voting continues to be rare in U.S. politics. With control of the Senate at stake on Nov. 3, just 4% of registered voters in states with a Senate contest say they will support Donald Trump or Joe Biden and a Senate candidate from the opposing party.

In voting for both the House and Senate, partisanship prevails. About eight-in-ten of voters (78%) say they will vote (or already have voted) for either Biden and the Democratic House of Representatives candidate (43% of all voters) or Trump and the Republican candidate (35% of all voters) in their congressional district.

Only 4% of registered voters say they plan to vote for Biden and the Republican candidate for House in their district or Donald Trump and the Democratic House candidate. This is little changed from four years ago. It is more common for voters to say they plan to vote for a third-party candidate for president (or less commonly, for the House) and a major-party candidate for the other race. Still, only 6% of voters say they plan to cast their ballots this way.

Similarly, among those living in states with Senate races, the largest share of voters say they plan to vote for both Biden and the Democratic Senate candidate (42%) or Trump and the Republican Senate candidate (38%) in their state. A recent analysis of U.S. Senate elections since 2012 shows how rare it is for a Senate race to go a different way from a state’s votes in presidential elections. In 139 regular and special elections for the Senate since 2012, 88% have been won by candidates from the same party that won that state’s most recent presidential contest.

This analysis of split-ticket voting is based on Pew Research Center’s recent national survey, conducted Sept. 30 to Oct. 5 among 11,929 U.S. adults, including 10,543 registered voters in which Biden garners support from 52% of registered voters and Trump is supported by 42%. The survey used information about respondents’ locations to present survey-takers with the names of the candidates running in each congressional race.
Modest demographic differences in split-ticket voting

Majorities of every major demographic group in the electorate are voting for the same party’s candidate in the presidential election and the congressional election in their district. The share of voters in any major demographic group that casts a ballot for both a Republican and a Democratic candidate in these elections is usually less than 5% across major demographic groups.

Straight-ticket voting mirrors presidential voting patterns. Men are more likely than women to vote for Republican candidates in both the House and presidential elections, while women are more likely to support Democratic candidates in both.

White voters are substantially more likely than voters of other racial and ethnic backgrounds to vote for Republican candidates in both the congressional and presidential elections.

The share of voters casting a straight-ticket Republican ballot in these elections increases steadily with age. Only 22% of Gen Z voters are voting this way, compared with nearly half (47%) of Silent Generation voters.

Gen Z and Millennial voters are also more likely than voters in older generations to support third- or fourth-party candidates for president; 13% of Gen Z voters favor non-major party candidates for either House or president, as do 9% of Millennial voters. Thus, larger shares of voters in these generations split their votes for president and the House. But just 3% of Gen Z voters and 4% of Millennials favor Biden and a Republican House candidate or Trump and a Democrat. That is comparable to the shares of older voters who divide preferences on a partisan basis in voting for president and the House.

Voters with a bachelor’s degree or more education are much more likely to vote a straight Democratic ticket in these races than are those with less education. There is no relationship between education and Republican-Democratic split-ticket voting; equal shares of voters (4%) across different levels of educational attainment vote this way.

Lower-engagement voters – those who say they have given less than “a lot” of thought to the presidential race – are more likely than others to split their tickets between the Republican and Democratic candidates in the presidential and congressional elections in their districts, though it is still very uncommon (6% of lower-engagement voters vs. 3% of those who are paying a lot of attention to the race).

These lower-engagement voters are much more likely to support minor-party candidates in either the presidential race or the congressional race in their district (14% of those who are paying less than “some” attention to the race vs. 5% of those who are paying “a lot” of attention).

Among all registered voters, Democrats hold an edge in congressional elections, with 46% of voters saying they will vote (or have already voted) for the Democratic candidate in their district and 40% saying they support the Republican candidate. About one-in-ten voters (11%) are not sure whom they will support.

Trump voters and Biden voters overwhelmingly say they support the same party’s candidate for the congressional race in their district (83% of each say they will support a candidate of the same party). Voters who support minor-party candidates for president are about evenly divided in their vote for the House of Representatives (29% support the Democrat and 31% support the Republican).

Trump supporters and Biden supporters living in districts with an opposite-party incumbent are slightly more likely to split their tickets than those living in districts with a same-party incumbent or an open-seat contest. Trump supporters in districts with Democratic incumbents and Biden supporters in districts with Republican incumbents are also more likely than those with same-party incumbents to say they are undecided in the congressional race.

Overall in states where there is a Senate contest, support for Senate candidates is roughly evenly divided. The share of voters supporting the Democratic candidate (45%) in their state is similar to the share supporting the Republican candidate (43%), and 8% of voters say they aren’t sure at this point whom they will support.

Similar to the elections for the House of Representatives, overwhelming shares of voters who are supporting Trump (88%) and Biden (84%) say they are also supporting the same-party candidate for Senate, while those who are supporting a minor-party candidate are more divided (27% support the Democratic candidate in their state and 35% support the Republican candidate).

Unlike in the House elections, there is less evidence that incumbency has any effect on split-ticket voting in these higher-profile Senate races.

domingo, 18 de octubre de 2020

Latino voters have growing confidence in Biden on key issues, while confidence in Trump remains low



As Election Day nears, Hispanic registered voters in the United States express growing confidence in Joe Biden’s ability to handle key issues like the coronavirus outbreak, with women and college graduates especially confident. By contrast, Hispanics’ views of Donald Trump on major issues are largely negative and mostly unchanged from June. These views of the 2020 presidential candidates come as most Hispanic voters continue to hold bleak views of the nation and its economy after months of widespread job losses and illness due to COVID-19, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted Sept. 30-Oct. 5.

About two-thirds of Latino registered voters say they are somewhat or very confident in Biden to tackle five issues asked about in October, with confidence in Biden higher on every issue since June. The share with confidence in Biden to handle the public health impact of the coronavirus outbreak is up 8 percentage points, 71% in October vs. 62% in June. The largest increase – 15 points – came on confidence in Biden’s ability to bring the country closer together, a margin of 70% vs. 55%. Meanwhile, 66% have confidence in Biden to make good decisions about economic policy, up from 58% who said so in June. In an earlier survey this summer, Latino voters said the economy, health care and the coronavirus outbreak were three of the most important issues to their vote for president.

U.S. registered voters overall also express growing confidence on Biden on these issues, though the increases were more modest and confidence was lower than among Latino voters. For example, 57% of U.S. voters say they have confidence in Biden to handle the public health impact of the coronavirus outbreak, up from 52% in June.

How we did this

Pew Research Center conducted this study to understand how Americans view the upcoming 2020 presidential election and the presidential candidates. For this analysis, we surveyed 11,929 U.S. adults, including 1,347 Hispanic registered voters, during the last week of September and the first week of October 2020. The survey was in the field when Trump announced, early on the morning of Oct. 2, that he and first lady Melania Trump had contracted COVID-19.

Estimates of Hispanic eligible voters in battleground states are based on the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2018 American Community Survey provided through Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) from the University of Minnesota.

Everyone who took part in this survey is a member of Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel (ATP), an online survey panel that is recruited through national, random sampling of residential addresses. This way nearly all U.S. adults have a chance of selection. The survey is weighted to be representative of the U.S. adult population by gender, race, ethnicity, partisan affiliation, education and other categories. Read more about the ATP’s methodology.

Here are the questions used for this report, along with responses, and its methodology.

Latino voters have significantly less confidence in Trump on these issues. Fewer than half say they are somewhat or very confident that he can handle the five issues, with views on most largely unchanged since summer. Only about three-in-ten Latino voters (29%) say they are confident that Trump can handle the health impact of the coronavirus outbreak. A higher share (44%) are confident that Trump can make good decisions about economic policy. Notably, a declining share of Latino voters say they have confidence that the president can bring the country closer together – 20% in October, down from 28% in June.

Among all U.S. voters, confidence in Trump on these issues is also mostly unchanged, though Americans overall have more confidence in the president than Latino voters. Four-in-ten U.S. registered voters (40%) say they have confidence in Trump to handle the health impact of COVID-19, and 30% have confidence that Trump can bring the country closer together. These shares are little changed from June.

A record 32 million Hispanics are projected to be eligible to vote in 2020, a total that for the first time exceeds the number of Black eligible voters in a presidential election. Hispanic voter turnout has historically lagged that of other groups, though turnout spiked among Hispanics and other groups for the 2018 midterms and approached levels normally seen during presidential election years. Even so, Hispanics made up only 8% of all voters in 2018, compared with 10% in 2016. (Explore our interactive maps and tables to see Latino eligible voters by state and congressional district.)
Biden leads among Hispanic voters

Biden holds a 34-point advantage over Trump among Latino eligible voters, far larger than Biden’s 10-point lead among all U.S. voters. In the new survey, 63% of Latino voters say they would vote for Biden or lean toward voting for him if the election were held today, while 29% say they would vote for Trump or lean toward voting for him. In 2016, Latino voters had similar preferences, according to exit polls and a Pew Research Center study of validated voters.

Among Hispanic voters, a higher share of college graduates than those with some college experience or less say they favor Biden, 69% vs. 61%. Meanwhile, 67% of Hispanic women voters and 59% of registered Hispanic men say they prefer Biden.

More Latino voters who support Biden say their choice is more of a vote against Trump than it is a vote for Biden, 59% vs. 40%.

At the same time, Hispanic voters who back Biden are sure about their choice, with 86% saying they are certain they will vote for him – similar to the share among all U.S. voters who support Biden. However, only 57% of Hispanic voters who prefer Biden say they are extremely motivated to vote, a lower share than among the 72% of Biden supporters nationwide.
Hispanic voters in battleground states

Biden holds a narrower lead over Trump (54% vs. 37%) among Latino registered voters in nine “battleground” states – Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

Stronger Hispanic support for Trump in battleground states reflects the group’s large population in Florida, where Cuban Americans have helped shape a Hispanic electorate that leans more Republican than Hispanic voters nationwide.

The nine battleground states together have more than 6.3 million Hispanic eligible voters – defined as adult U.S. citizens – and Florida alone (3.1 million) accounts for half of the total. The next largest state is Arizona, with nearly 1.2 million Hispanic eligible voters. In both states, Hispanics make up a fifth or more of all eligible voters – 20% in Florida and 24% in Arizona.

The remaining battleground states, with a combined 2 million Hispanic eligible voters, have smaller but still notable Hispanic electorates. For example, Pennsylvania (521,000), Michigan (261,000) and Wisconsin (183,000) each have sizable numbers of Hispanic eligible voters that can play a role in swinging close elections. In 2016, the presidential contests in these states were decided by a combined total of 77,744 votes.
Impact of COVID-19 on Hispanics

The coronavirus has disproportionately harmed the personal finances of Hispanics, with Hispanic women experiencing the largest job losses of any racial or ethnic group, regardless of gender. About half of Hispanics (53%) say they or someone in their household has been laid off or taken a pay cut because of COVID-19, compared with 42% of all U.S. adults. Since the outbreak started in February, significant shares of Hispanics say they have used money from savings or retirement funds to pay bills (43%), had trouble paying bills (37%), gotten food from a food bank (30%) or had problems paying their rent or mortgage (26%).

Latinos have also experienced disproportionate health impacts from COVID-19. As of mid-August, about one-in-five Latino adults (22%) said they have had a positive coronavirus test (7%) or were “pretty sure” they have had it (15%). By contrast, 14% of all U.S. adults said they have had a positive test (3%) or were pretty sure they have had the virus (11%).

In the new survey, the Hispanic voter groups most confident that Biden can handle the public health impact of the coronavirus outbreak include women (80%) and college graduates (79%). By contrast, lower shares of Hispanic male voters (61%) and Hispanic voters with some college education or less (68%) say they are somewhat or very confident in Biden.

Hispanic voters have far less confidence in Trump’s ability to handle COVID-19, though there are some differences by education. Especially low shares of Hispanic voters who are college graduates (22%) say they have confidence in Trump to handle the public health impact of the coronavirus outbreak, compared with 31% of those with some college education or less. Meanwhile, 26% of Hispanic women voters and 33% of Hispanic male voters have confidence in Trump to handle the outbreak.
Few Latinos view the economy as good, although there is optimism for the future

Roughly three-in-ten Latino registered voters (29%) rate economic conditions in the country as excellent or good, up from 20% in June, but lower than the 35% of all U.S. voters who say so. For Latino voters, the share remains far below the 49% who gave a positive rating to U.S. economic conditions in January, about two months before President Trump declared a national emergency on March 13 due to COVID-19.

Hispanic male voters have a more positive view of the nation’s economy than Hispanic women voters, 34% vs. 23%. Differences also exist by education among Hispanic voters, with 31% of those with some college education or less rating the economy as excellent or good, compared with 22% of college graduates.

Among Biden supporters, only 14% of Latino voters rate the U.S. economy as excellent or good.

Hispanics have some optimism about the future of the economy. About half of Hispanic voters (53%) say they expect economic conditions will be better a year from now, while 30% say conditions will be about the same and 16% say they will worsen.

Older Hispanics have more optimism on this measure than younger Hispanics. About six-in-ten (60%) Hispanic voters ages 50 and older say U.S. economic conditions will be better a year from now, compared with about half (48%) of Hispanic voters ages 18 to 49. Somewhat similar shares of men (57%) and women (49%) among Hispanic voters say economic conditions will have improved in a year. There was no difference by education levels among Hispanic voters, with about half of college graduates and those with some college experience or less saying the economic conditions will be better in a year.
Most Latino voters say they are ‘fearful’ about the state of the nation

Roughly two-thirds of Latino registered voters (68%) say they are fearful about the state of the nation. Meanwhile, 45% of Latino voters say they are hopeful. These views are similar to those reported in June, and similar to those among U.S. voters overall. Latino voters across demographic groups express similar levels of fear when thinking about the state of the country. By contrast, levels of hope for the country among Latino voters vary by gender and education levels.

About half of Hispanic men registered to vote (51%) say they feel hopeful about the state of the country, compared with only 36% of Hispanic women voters. Meanwhile, 37% of Hispanic voters with a bachelor’s degree or more say the feel hopeful, while 47% of Hispanic voters with some college experience or less say the same.

Among Biden supporters, 79% of Latino voters say they feel fearful about the state of the country. Meanwhile, 36% say they feel hopeful.

Latinos voters also had negative views about the nation’s direction. Only one-in-five (21%) say they are satisfied with the way things are going in the country today, a similar share to June (19%) but down from 32% in December 2019.

miércoles, 14 de octubre de 2020

Trump, Biden Supporters Divided in Views of 2020 Election Process – and Whether It Will Be Clear Who Won

 A ballot drop-off box outside a Los Angeles library on Oct. 5.


A large majority of voters say it is important for Americans to know who won the presidential election within a day or two of Election Day. But just half say they are very or somewhat confident that this will happen, including nearly identical shares who support Donald Trump and Joe Biden.

Trump and Biden supporters have deep disagreements over several other aspects of the election and voting process – including whether it will be clear which candidate won even after all the votes are counted. About three-quarters of registered voters who support Biden (76%) are confident that the country will know the winner of the presidential election after all the votes are counted, including 30% who are very confident.

A much smaller majority of Trump supporters (55%) are confident that Americans will have a clear sense of who won, with just 13% saying they are very confident the winner will be clearly known after all the votes are counted.

The new survey by Pew Research Center, conducted Sept. 30-Oct. 5 among 11,929 U.S. adults, including 10,543 registered voters, finds that Trump and Biden supporters also have very different views of the impact of the coronavirus outbreak on the safety of voting in the Nov. 3 presidential election. Among all registered voters, 79% say they are very or somewhat confident that in-person voting places will be run safely, without spreading the coronavirus. But just a third are very confident that the coronavirus will not be spread at in-person voting sites.

Majorities of both Trump (91%) and Biden supporters (70%) are at least somewhat confident that in-person voting places will be run safely, without the spread of the disease. Yet while about half of Trump supporters (53%) are very confident that COVID-19 will not be spread by in-person voting, just 17% of Biden supporters say the same.

Trump supporters are more than twice as likely than Biden supporters to say they plan to cast their ballots in the presidential election in person on Election Day (50% vs. 20%). By contrast, far more Biden than Trump supporters say they plan to vote – or already have voted – by absentee or mail-in ballot (51% Biden supporters, compared with 25% of those who back Trump). Similar shares of Trump and Biden supporters (20% and 22%, respectively), plan to vote, or have voted, in person before Election Day.

For the most part, both Trump and Biden supporters are at least somewhat confident that votes cast in person will be counted as voters intended. Yet they differ sharply over whether absentee or mail-in ballots will be counted as voters intended: 77% of Biden supporters are very or somewhat confident, compared with fewer than half as many Trump supporters (36%).

Trump supporters also are more skeptical about whether mail-in ballots will be delivered in time to be counted. Only a third of Trump supporters are very or somewhat confident that ballots sent by mail will be delivered in enough time to be counted; that compares with 67% of Biden supporters who express confidence that mail ballots will be delivered in time.

The new survey finds that while large majorities of voters think that the elections in their community will be run and administered very or somewhat well, they are less confident in the administration of elections throughout the country. And voters’ confidence in elections in the United States has declined since 2018 – with most of the change coming among voters who supported Republican candidates then and Trump today.

Currently, 90% of registered voters say they are very (44%) or somewhat confident (46%) that elections in their community will be run and administered very or somewhat well. But a smaller majority (62%) expects that elections in the U.S. will be administered well.

Voters were more positive in views of election administration shortly before the 2018 midterm elections. In October 2018, about nine-in-ten said they expected elections in their community (92%) and in the U.S. (81%) to be run and administered very or somewhat well.

In the current survey, large majorities of Biden (94%) and Trump supporters (88%) say elections will be administered well in their communities, though there are much wider disparities in views of the administration of elections across the country. While 72% of Biden supporters say the elections around the nation will be run and administered well, just half of Trump supporters say the same.
Other findings from the survey

Rise in share of Biden supporters who say it will be “easy” to vote. Among registered voters, a majority of Biden supporters (62%) now expect it will be easy to vote, compared with 38% who say it will be difficult. That represents a major shift in opinion since August, when just 40% of Biden supporters said it would be easy to vote. There has been less change among Trump supporters; 70% say it will be easy to vote today, up from 64% in August. Still, voters remain less likely to say voting will be easy than they were on the eve of the 2018 midterms.

Sharp divide between Trump, Biden supporters over importance of preventing those ineligible to vote from casting ballots. Barring people who are ineligible to vote from voting is much more important priority for Trump than Biden supporters. While majorities of both candidates’ supporters view this as very or somewhat important, 86% of Trump supporters view this as very important, compared with 49% of Biden supporters. And a far lower share of voters who support Trump (36%) than Biden supporters (86%) are very or somewhat confident that those ineligible to vote will not be allowed to cast ballots.

Majority of voters are confident election systems are secure from technological threats. Overall, 56% of voters say they are very or somewhat confident that election systems in the U.S. are secure from hacking and other technological threats. That is higher than the share of voters who said this two years ago (47%). Democratic voters, in particular, have become more confident; the share of Biden supporters who are confident election systems are secure from technological threats is 19 percentage points higher today when compared with supporters of Democratic congressional candidates in the 2018 midterms (53% now, 34% then). There has been less change among those backing GOP candidates in 2018 and Trump supporters today (60% now, 65% then).
Widespread agreement on importance of ensuring that people who are legally qualified to vote are able to cast ballots

Voters are in broad agreement about the importance of ensuring that all people who are legally qualified and want to vote are able to cast their ballots: Nearly all registered voters (99%) say this is at least somewhat important, including 92% who say it is very important. Sizable majorities of voters (84%) also say it is at least somewhat important that people who are not legally qualified to vote are prevented from voting, though fewer say this is very important (65%).

With the expectation that a far larger share of voters will cast their ballots by mail than in past elections comes the prospect that counting those ballots may take substantially longer than in past years. But about half of registered voters (52%) say it is very important that Americans know who won the election with a day or two of Election Day, and 82% say this is at least somewhat important.

Virtually all Trump and Biden supporters (99% each) say it is at least somewhat important that all voters who are qualified and want to vote are able to cast their ballots in the election, and at least nine-in-ten in both coalitions say this is very important.

By contrast, there is far less uniformity when it comes to the importance of people who are ineligible to vote being prevented from voting. While clear majorities of both coalitions say this is at least somewhat important (93% of Trump supporters, 78% of Biden voters), Trump supporters are much more likely to consider this very important: 86% say this, compared with about half (49%) of Biden backers.

Trump supporters also are substantially more likely than Biden supporters to say that knowing the winner of the election within a few days is important. More than nine-in-ten Trump supporters (94%) say it is at least somewhat important that the winner of the election be known within a day or two of the polls closing, including 69% who say this is very important. While most Biden supporters (73%) say this at least somewhat important, only 39% say it is very important.
Most voters are at least somewhat confident that polling places will be run safely without spreading the coronavirus

Wide majorities of American voters express confidence that those who are legally qualified to vote will be able to do so and that polling places will safely be run without spreading the coronavirus. But there is considerably less confidence that the winner of the election will be known within a few days of Election Day and that mail ballots will arrive in time to be counted.

More than eight-in-ten registered voters (84%) say they are at least somewhat confident that people who are legally qualified and want to vote will be able to cast a ballot, while nearly as many (79%) express confidence that in-person polling places will be run safely and without spreading the coronavirus. About two-thirds (66%) say they are at least somewhat confident that after all votes are counted, it will be clear who won the election, while 62% are at least somewhat confident that people who are not legally qualified to vote will be prevented from casting ballots.

While most voters express at least some confidence in these four aspects of the presidential election, relatively small shares are very confident of each. For example, only about four-in-ten say they are very confident that people who are legally qualified and want to vote will be able to cast a ballot in the election, while only 22% say they are very confident that once the votes are counted it will be clear who won the election.

Voters are less confident that the nation will know the outcome of the election within a few days of Nov. 3 or that mail-in ballots will be delivered in time to be counted, with about half saying they are at least somewhat confident these will happen (50% and 52%, respectively). Just 13% of voters say they are very confident mail ballots will be delivered on time, while a similarly slim share (15%) say they are very confident the winner will be known within a day or two of Election Day.

There are sizable gaps in confidence between Trump and Biden voters in these expectations for the election.

Though majorities of Trump and Biden voters say they are at least somewhat confident that people who are legally qualified and want to vote are able to cast a ballot, Trump voters are more likely than Biden voters to say this (93% vs. 77%, respectively). And while only about a third of Biden supporters (32%) are very confident that people who want to vote will be able to, half of Trump voters have a high level of confidence this will occur.

Trump supporters are also far more confident than Biden voters about the safety of in-person polling places: 91% of Trump voters are at least somewhat confident that in-person polling places will be run safely without spreading the coronavirus, including 53% who are very confident. Seven-in-ten Biden voters say they are at least somewhat confident this will happen, but just 17% are very confident.

In contrast, Biden supporters are more confident than Trump backers that once votes have been counted in the election, it will be clear which candidate won. About three-quarters (76%) of Biden supporters are at least somewhat confident that this will happen, compared with 55% of Trump supporters.

Biden supporters also are considerably more confident than Trump supporters that mail ballots will be delivered in time to be counted. About two-thirds (67%) of Biden supporters are very or somewhat confident mail ballots will be delivered in time to be counted; just a third of Trump supporters say the same.

The biggest difference between Trump and Biden supporters across the six items is on whether people who are not legally qualified to vote will be prevented from casting ballots: 84% of Biden voters say they are least somewhat confident ineligible voters will be prevented from voting, including four-in-ten who say they are very confident about this. In contrast, just 35% of Trump supporters say they are at least somewhat confident that those who are not legally qualified to vote will be prevented from casting ballots.

Notably, there are no significant differences between Trump and Biden supporters in their expectations about knowing the election result shortly after Election Day. Among both groups of voters, about half are confident that Americans will know the winner of the presidential contest within a day or two of Election Day. Just 16% of Trump supporters and 15% of Biden supporters are very confident the results will be finalized within days after Nov. 3.
Biden and Trump backers’ priorities, expectations about voter access

Trump supporters overwhelmingly say it is very important that ineligible voters are prevented from casting ballots in the presidential election, yet far fewer are confident that this will happen: 93% say it is at least somewhat important (including 86% who say this is very important), but only about a third (35%) say they are confident that ineligible voters will be prevented from voting this year.

Among Biden supporters, in contrast, more than eight-in-ten (84%) say they are at least somewhat confident that ineligible voters will be prevented from voting – modestly larger than the 78% who say this is at least somewhat important.

Conversely, although about three-quarters of Biden voters say they are at least somewhat confident that all voters who are legally qualified and want to vote will be able to cast a ballot, nearly all (99%) say it is important that they be able to do so. Among Trump supporters, more than nine-in-ten say both that they are confident that all eligible voters will be able to cast ballots (93%) and that this is important (99%).

Among Biden supporters, White voters are somewhat more likely than Black and Hispanic voters to say it is “very” important that all eligible voters be allowed to vote (96% of White Biden supporters say this, compared with 86% of Black Biden supporters and 90% of Hispanic Biden supporters) and are somewhat less likely to say they are very confident that this will be the case (25% of White Biden supporters vs. 45% of Black and 37% of Hispanic Biden backers).

Overall, the share of voters who say it is important for Americans to know who won the election within a day or two of Election Day (82%) is substantially larger than the share who say they are confident this will happen (50%). These gaps are present among both Trump supporters and Biden supporters, though they are wider among Trump supporters.

Nearly all Trump supporters (94%) say it is at least somewhat important to learn the results of the election quickly, while about three-quarters (73%) of Biden voters say the same. Only about half (48%) of Trump and Biden supporters (50%) say they are at least somewhat confident this will happen.
Fewer now say elections across the country will be run and administered well than in 2018

Voters largely think that elections in their area will be run well this year. Fully nine-in-ten registered voters (90%) say that elections in their communities will be run and administered very or somewhat well, little different than the share saying this in the weeks before the 2018 midterm election.

But a narrower majority of voters – 62% – say that elections across the country will be run and administered very or somewhat well this year; 19 percentage points lower than the share saying this before the 2018 midterms (81%).

In 2018, nearly nine-in-ten voters who supported or leaned toward a Republican candidate for the House of Representatives (87%) said that elections in the U.S. would be run and administered very or somewhat well. Today, 50% of voters who support or lean toward Donald Trump say this, and just 9% say elections in the U.S. will be administered very well.

In contrast, 72% of Biden supporters now say elections around the country will be run and administered at least somewhat well, only modestly lower than the 79% of Democratic voters in 2018 who said this.

There are only modest differences in these views across racial and ethnic groups, with about eight-in-ten or more White (92%), Black (89%) and Hispanic voters (84%) saying that elections in their community will be administered very or somewhat well this November. However, White voters are slightly less likely than either Black voters or Hispanic voters to say that elections across the country will be run and administered well. About two-thirds of Hispanic voters (66%) and a similar share of Black voters (64%) say elections in the U.S. will be administered somewhat or very well this November, with about two-in-ten in both groups saying they will be administered very well. Among White voters, 61% say elections across the country will be administered at least somewhat well, including 13% who say they will be administered very well.

Older voters are more likely than younger voters to say that the November elections will be administered well, both in their communities and in the country as a whole. More than nine-in-ten voters ages 65 and older (94%) say that the elections in their communities will be administered somewhat or very well, compared with 83% of voters ages 18 to 29. And about two-thirds of voters 65 and older (68%) say elections across the U.S. this November will be administered somewhat or very well, compared with 56% of those ages 18 to 29 and 57% of those 30 to 49.
Voters overwhelmingly confident in counting of votes cast in person, but are less confident about votes cast by mail

About nine-in-ten registered voters (91%) are at least somewhat confident that votes cast in person at polling places around the country will be counted as voters intended. This includes nearly half of voters (49%) who are very confident of this. Just 9% of registered voters say they are either not too confident (7%) or not at all confident (2%) that votes cast in person will be counted as intended.

A smaller majority of voters, 59%, say they are at least somewhat confident that votes cast by absentee or mail-in ballot will be counted as voters intended, including 20% who are very confident. About a quarter (26%) say they are not too confident that votes cast by mail will be counted as intended and 14% say they are not at all confident.

When it comes to votes cast in person, large majorities of both candidates’ supporters express confidence in a fair vote count. Nine-in-ten Biden voters say they are very confident that these votes will be counted as intended, as do 92% of Trump voters.

Most Biden supporters also express confidence that votes cast by absentee or mail-in ballot will be counted as intended: More than three-quarters (77%) say they are somewhat (47%) or very confident (30%). By comparison, 36% of Trump supporters say they are somewhat or very confident these votes will be counted as voters intended. And Trump backers are more than twice as likely to say they are not at all confident of this as they are to say they are very confident.

Among Trump voters, there is little difference between strong and moderate supporters in confidence in the in-person vote count. However, those who say they support Trump moderately or lean toward Trump are almost twice as likely to express confidence in the mail-in ballot count as those who say they support Trump strongly: 54% of moderate Trump supporters and Trump leaners say they are very or somewhat confident that absentee and mail-in votes will be counted as intended, compared with just 28% of strong Trump supporters.

There also are differences in views of how mail votes are counted between voters who support Biden strongly and those who back him less strongly. Strong Biden supporters are 14 percentage points more likely than moderate Biden supporters to say they are very or somewhat confident in how mail-in votes will be counted (83% vs. 69%).

Overall, a majority of registered voters (57%) say they are at least somewhat confident that both in-person and mail-in ballots will be counted as voters intended. One-third say they are confident in how in-person ballots will be counted but not how mail-in ballots will be counted.

Among Trump supporters, just over a third (36%) say they have confidence in how both types of ballots will be counted, compared with a majority (56%) who say they have confidence in in-person ballots but not mail-in ballots.

Among Biden voters, three-quarters say they are confident that both types of ballots will be counted as voters intended.

About eight-in-ten voters who plan to vote by absentee or mail-in ballot (or who have already done so) say they are somewhat or very confident that these ballots will be counted as voters intend. This includes nearly two-thirds of Trump voters (65%) and 86% of Biden voters who plan to vote this way.

Fewer than half of voters who plan to vote or have voted in person (45%) say they are somewhat or very confident in the counting of mail-in ballots. About seven-in-ten Biden voters (71%) and just a quarter of Trump supporters who plan to vote in person say this.

White voters, Black voters, and Hispanic voters express similar levels of confidence in the counting of mail-in ballots. However, White voters are sharply divided by candidate preference, with White Biden supporters 50 percentage points more likely than White Trump supporters to say they are somewhat or very confident that these votes will be counted as voters intended. Among Biden supporters, 84% of White voters say they are somewhat or very confident, compared with seven-in-ten Hispanic voters and six-in-ten Black voters.

Registered voters ages 65 and older, regardless of candidate preference, are more likely than others to say they are somewhat or very confident that mail-in ballots will be counted as voters intend.

Voters who live in states with the strictest requirements for voting by mail are less likely than those who live in states where absentee or mail-in ballots are more widely available to say that they are confident in how mail-in ballots will be counted. (See Appendix for details.)

Half of voters living in states where an excuse is required to vote by absentee or mail-in ballot say they are somewhat or very confident that votes cast by mail will be counted as voters intended. That rises to about six-in-ten among voters living in states where no excuse is required (59%) and among voters in states where all registered voters are sent an application to vote by mail (62%). Nearly two-thirds of voters living in states where all registered voters receive a ballot by mail (66%) say they are confident that votes cast by mail-in ballot will be counted as voters intended.

Among Biden voters, those living in states where all voters will be mailed a ballot are 9 percentage points more likely than those living in states where an excuse is required to vote by mail to say they are somewhat or very confident in the counting of ballots cast by mail. Among Trump supporters, this gap is 15 points.
Voters are less concerned over hacking and other technological threats to the election compared with 2018

A majority of registered voters (56%) say they are somewhat (47%) or very (9%) confident that election systems in the U.S. are secure from hacking and other technological threats. About three-in-ten (31%) say they are not too confident that election systems are secure, while 13% say they are not at all confident.

Majorities of both Trump voters and Biden voters say they are somewhat or very confident that election systems are secure, though Trump supporters are slightly more likely to say this than Biden supporters (60% vs. 53%). Roughly one-in-ten Trump voters and a similar share of Biden voters (8%) say they are very confident. And nearly identical shares of Trump voters (12%) and Biden voters (13%) say they are not at all confident that U.S. election systems are secure from technological threats.

The share of registered voters who say they are confident in the security of election systems has increased since just before the 2018 general election, when 47% of registered voters said they were somewhat (38%) or very (9%) confident.

Among voters who planned to vote for a Democratic candidate for the House of Representatives in 2018, about one-third (34%) said they were somewhat or very confident that election systems were secure. Nearly two-thirds of voters who planned to vote for a Republican candidate for the House (65%) said this.

Today, about two-thirds of registered voters (65%) say they expect voting in this November’s elections to be easy, while 35% say it will be difficult. The share of voters who expect voting to be easy is 14 percentage points higher than it was two months ago, when half said they expected voting to be easy (50%), while roughly as many (49%) said it would be difficult. Still, the share of voters expecting voting to be easy remains significantly lower than it was at this time in the 2018 election (65% today, 85% then).

The rise in the share of voters saying voting will be easy since August is largely attributable to shifting views among Biden voters. In August, more Biden voters said that voting would be difficult (60%) than easy (40%). Today, 62% of Biden voters say they expect voting will be easy.

A slightly larger share of Trump supporters also say they expect voting will be easy compared with August (70% today vs. 64% then).

While the shares of voters who expect voting to be easy has increased across most all demographic subgroups since August, there are still sizable gaps in perceptions of the voting process by age and race.

About two-thirds of White voters (68%) say they expect voting will be very or somewhat easy, including a third who say they expect voting will be very easy.

Black and Hispanic voters are less likely than White voters to say the voting process will be easy (55% and 60%, respectively).

Younger voters – especially those under 30 – are also less likely than their older counterparts to expect voting will be easy: 55% of voters ages 18 to 29 say voting will be easy, while over two-thirds of voters 30 and older say the same.

When it comes to meeting several legal requirements to vote – including being registered in time to vote, having the proper type of picture identification or signature match on file for mail ballots – the vast majority of voters say they are very confident that they will meet these requirements (94%). This includes 95% of Trump voters, and a similar share of Biden voters (94%). However, Black (91%) and Hispanic voters (88%) are modestly less likely than White voters (96%) to say they are very confident they will meet these requirements.